Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) is a stretching technique used for muscle lengthening and fascial release. AIS provides an effective, dynamic and facilitated stretch of major muscle groups. 

 
 

AIS is a method of muscle and connective tissue release based on working with the body’s stretch reflexes. 

It involves holding each stretch for only two seconds which allows the body to repair itself and prepare for daily activity. 

This method of stretching works with the body’s natural physiological makeup to improve circulation and increase the elasticity of muscle, joints, and connective tissue. 

AIS provides functional and physiological restoration of superficial and deep fascial planes.

WHAT IS ACTIVE ISOLATED STRETCHING? 
Active Isolated Stretching (AIS) is a stretching technique used for muscle lenthening and fas­cia! release that provides an effective, dynam­ic and facilitated stretch of major muscle groups. Simply stated, AIS is a method of muscle and connective tissue release based on working with the body's stretch reflexes. It involves holding each stretch for only two seconds which allows the body to repair itself and prepare for daily activity. This method of stretching works with the body's natural phys­iological makeup to improve circulation and increase the elasticiy of muscle, joints and connective tissue. Most importantly, AIS pro­vides functional and physiological restoration of superficial and deep fascial planes. 

What is the significance of Active Isolated Stretching?

Joe Gajnos is a leading practitioner of AIS. This system of stretching exercises has been developed to isolate muscle groups that pro­vide specific joint movement. Central to the AIS technique is this reciprocal innervation and inhibition activity - While certain muscles work, the muscles on the opposite side relax. 
Through the stretching of specific muscles and supportive connective tissues, optimum blood circulation is achieved. Stretching also maximizes oxygenation, relaxation, lymphatic circulation, nutritional deliverance and tissue elongation. All are critical to a healthy state of flexibility.